Action Line Consumer Alert: Drip fees

Action Line: drip fees

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Have you ever heard of “drip” fees? If you’ve ever rented a car for a quoted price, but ended up paying more than that, you may have been dripped.

They’re called drip fees because they trickle down adding to the price you pay on your bill.

“Sometimes these costs they’re not completely hidden they’re in places that consumers don’t really read well enough, said Timothy Caminos, Hawaii Better Business Bureau.

The bad news for consumers — it’s not illegal.  So if you don’t have proof of a lower priced quote, you’ll have to pay the higher price.

“It’s definitely not illegal for businesses to do it because in the end consumers are still responsible for what they’re going to be getting into and paying for,” Caminos said.

So bottom line: read the fine print.

The Hawaii Better Business bureau says you can avoid paying for services you don’t want.

“Ask them what the final price is going to be for in writing and save it in your email many people have a smartphone these days so if someone tries to give you a different price or a different quote or at the end you can pull up the information 1013 and show them what you were given previously,” Caminos said.

There haven’t been any complaints to the Hawaii BBB about local businesses adding drip fees, but Hawaii residents say it happens to them when they go out of state.

“When you go on vacation this summer read the fine print make sure you know exactly what you’re paying for and how much it’s going to be,” Caminos said.

Have a concern? Email actionline@khon2.com or call (808) 591-0222 weekdays from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

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