Internationally acclaimed art exhibit arrives on Oahu for all to see

The Wonder of Learning

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The work created for, and by, children shares a unique way of viewing the world and education.

Socialization is one part of the puzzle when it comes to pre-school and preparing keiki for daily life. One method of inspiring young ones to absorb early childhood education is called the Reggio Emilia approach.

“It provides that foundation for exploration, for deep learning,” Edna Hussey with Mid-Pacific Institute said.

Reggio Emilia is a city in northern in Italy where this approach to learning was created. It is aimed at inspiring youngsters to use art, nature, and expression to think critically and become active learners.

“Children, very young children who are not quite yet ready to read in the way that you and I read or to write have access to many other languages of expression,” Hussey said.

Mid-Pacific Institute is a Reggio Emilia inspired preschool that is hosting a summer conference and “The Wonder of Learning” art exhibit beginning next week at UH West Oahu.

“The Wonder of Learning will give us and all of Hawaii insight into how children learn,” Hussey said.

The artwork created by children in the program is a traveling exhibit and was brought to the islands from the original school. After its time here for the next five months “The Wonder of Learning” will head to South Carolina and Mexico.

“So people can go to the exhibit and actually watch some video, listen to some of the sound ,there are some displays that are absolute interactive we call that the ray of light,” Hussey said.

50 residents have volunteered their time to install the interactive exhibit and once its ready it will occupy the UHWO’s entire first floor and part of the second floor.

“We want everyone to come and see it, some people think its only for teachers that’s absolutely not,” Hussey said.

The exhibit is free and open to the public starting next Thursday and continues through December 7.

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