Good samaritans pick up trash after Fourth of July celebrations

Fourth of July Clean Up

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The Fourth of July celebrations are over, but remnants from revelers are left behind.

“A lot of Heinekens,” Waikiki resident Jerry Wilkerson said. “Cans, Bud Light, Coors. Have all kinds.”

Celebrations across the island, including Flotilla in Waikiki and Ala Moana’s spectacular show at Magic Island, drew large crowds.

“It’s the best day of the whole year. The Fourth of July,” Wilkerson said.

Seven years ago, Wilkerson started cleaning up the beaches and lookouts.

“First thing in the morning I go up Tantulus and I recycle and pick up rubbish,” Wilkerson said. “You always have to keep your hands clean and wash at all times.”

Wilkerson then heads down to the beaches. And he isn’t alone.

“It actually looks very clean. I expected a little more trash, but I got here a little late and there were people, as you can see, picking up trash and collecting them in trash bags,” Kuliouou resident Freddy Luke said.

For some people, it’s because they feel passionate about the environment.

“Those people are the greatest. They are taking care of the aina,” Luke said.

For Wilkerson, it’s a way to make a little extra cash and stay in shape.

“[In] 2006, I weighed 187 pounds. In six months, 135 pounds picking up bottles and cans plastic and riding the bike back and forth, back and forth,” Wilkerson said.

“Whatever you bring to the beach, you should take with you when you leave and do a little bit extra,” Luke said.

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