Unique vessel docked at Honolulu Harbor turning heads

Pacific Tracker at Honolulu Harbor

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It’s nothing new to see ships in Honolulu Harbor, but there’s one there right now that’s prompting people’s curiosity.

It’s called the Pacific Tracker, and you’ve likely never seen anything like it.

“Looks like a bunch of gumdrops on top of a military vessel,” Punaluu resident Cliff Poteet said.

The Pacific Tracker calls Portsmouth, Virginia home.

But for the last few days it’s been docked at Honolulu Harbor.

According to a number of websites it’s a ship used by the military defense agency, as a missile tracking radar ship.

“You would think so. They found their parking spot in Honolulu Harbor,” Poteet said.

And, it’s a ship that had a number of names over the years.

When it was first built in Pascagoula, Mississippi in 1964 it was named the S.S Mormadraco.

Only to be renamed the S.S. American Draco in 1983.

In 1997, she was renamed the Beaver state, but oddly enough not birthed in Oregon, the Beaver state, but in Bremerton, Washington.

Only to be renamed in 2009 as the S.S. Pacific Tracker.

“I don’t know if it’s a ship, but there is a platform that comes into Pearl harbor all the time I see. It’s gotta a big ball on it like that. I thought it had to do with satellite, or tracking of some sort,” Poteet said.

That big golf ball looking ship at Pearl Harbor is an x-band radar vessel, retrofitted onto an old oil drilling platform.

According to the maritime blog the Pacific Tracker was acquired by the U.S. government in 2006 and turned into an x-band transportable radar ship.

The State Department of Transportation spokesperson says the vessel arrived at Honolulu Harbor on July 8 and will depart July 23.

 

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