Smoking ban in effect for all Oahu parks, beaches, bus stops

Smoking ban

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In July, the City council passed two smoking ban bills. On Sunday, Mayor Caldwell signed them into law. From now until Jan. 1, city officials will post signs and spread the word about the smoking ban, educating residents and visitors about what happens if they get caught.

Come Jan. 1, cigarette smokers could be fined if caught lighting up at any city beach, park, and or bus stop.

Residents and visitors who smoke at these places will have to find somewhere else to light up.

“It sounds like a good idea to me, even though I’m a smoker I actually really don’t like cigarette smoke myself,” smoker visiting from California Michael Massey said.

“If the law prohibits smoke here okay, it’s fair yes,” smoker visiting from Italy David Cassano said.

Bill 25 was introduced by City Council member Ikaika Anderson.

Bill 28 was introduced by City Council member Ron Menor.

The bills were signed into law by Mayor Kirk Caldwell on Sunday.

Before the bills were signed, those opposed felt the ban would have a negative impact on visitors.

But, with a smoking ban already in place at Hanauma bay since 1993, they haven’t seen a drop in visitors.

Community non-profit organizations and the state health department will educate residents and visitors about where they can and cannot smoke.

“It’s going to be multifaceted the education program it will include spots on TV radio in theaters posters, fliers announcements,” Beach Environmental Awareness Campaign Hawaii co-founder Suzanne Frazer said.

Another concern was how to fine smokers who wanted to smoke in the ocean.

Friday, an executive order was signed giving the city the authority to enforce the ban in the ocean fronting Kuhio Beach and Kapiolani Park.

“If someone wants to walk out into the water and wants to smoke a cigarette here it will be enforced and they will be told to stop,” Mayor Caldwell said.

However, if you smoke an e-cigarette those are allowed.

“E-cigarettes aren’t covered at this particular time so folks would be able to use e-cigarettes as an alternative on our beaches,” Honolulu City Councilmember Ikaika Anderson said.

Anyone caught smoking at any city park, beach and or bus stop you will be fined $100 for the first offense.

For each additional offense you could face up to a $500 fine.

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