Zuckerberg voices frustration with Obama over NSA

FILE - This Feb. 24, 2014 file photo shows Facebook Chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg during a conference in Barcelona, Spain. An advocacy group affiliated with Zuckerberg launched a nationwide ad on Monday that implores House Republicans to act this election year on legislation overhauling the nation’s immigration system. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez, File)
FILE - This Feb. 24, 2014 file photo shows Facebook Chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg during a conference in Barcelona, Spain. An advocacy group affiliated with Zuckerberg launched a nationwide ad on Monday that implores House Republicans to act this election year on legislation overhauling the nation’s immigration system. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez, File)

NEW YORK (AP) — Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg says he has called President Barack Obama to express his frustration over what he says is long-lasting damage caused by the U.S. government’s surveillance programs.

Posting on his Facebook page Thursday, Zuckerberg wrote that he’s been “confused and frustrated by the repeated reports of the behavior of the U.S. government. When our engineers work tirelessly to improve security, we imagine we’re protecting you against criminals, not our own government.”

Though Zuckerberg does not name the National Security Agency, the post comes a day after the news site Intercept reported that the agency has impersonated a Facebook server to infect surveillance targets’ computers and get files from a hard drive. The report is based on documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

The NSA called the report “inaccurate.”

“NSA uses its technical capabilities only to support lawful and appropriate foreign intelligence operations, all of which must be carried out in strict accordance with its authorities,” the agency said in a statement.

White House spokeswoman Caitlin Hayden confirmed that the president spoke with Zuckerberg Wednesday night regarding “recent reports in the press about alleged activities by the U.S. intelligence community.” She gave no further comment.

Technology companies including Facebook, Google Inc., Microsoft Corp., have been increasingly vocal about frustrations over the U.S. government’s spying programs. Last month, top executives from the companies, along with others from Yahoo, Twitter, AOL and LinkedIn, called for changes that would include a government agreement not to collect bulk data from Internet communications.

In Thursday’s post, Zuckerberg called on the government to be more transparent, but added that, unfortunately, “it seems like it will take a very long time for true full reform.”

In January, Obama ordered a series of changes to mass surveillance programs that included ending the government’s control of phone data from hundreds of millions of Americans and ordered intelligence agencies to get a court’s permission before accessing such records. Tech companies took the president’s speech as a step in the right direction, but said that more is needed to protect people’s privacy — along with the economic interests of U.S. companies that generate most of their revenue overseas.

U.S. Internet companies are worried that people, especially those living overseas, won’t trust them with personal information if they believe such data is being collected by the U.S. government.

“The U.S. government should be the champion for the Internet, not a threat. They need to be much more transparent about what they’re doing, or otherwise people will believe the worst,” Zuckerberg wrote.

The ongoing strife over surveillance could threaten what’s been a cordial relationship between Silicon Valley and the president. The region has voted overwhelmingly for Obama in both of the past two presidential elections. Nearly 70 percent of Santa Clara County, which is home to Facebook, Google, Yahoo and a slew of other tech giants, sided with the president in the 2012 elections.

Obama held a Facebook “town hall” meeting at the company’s headquarters in April 2011 and earlier that year had dinner with a group of tech leaders that included Zuckerberg, Google’s then-CEO Eric Schmidt and others.

Mark Zuckerberg’s post on Facebook:

As the world becomes more complex and governments everywhere struggle, trust in the internet is more important today than ever.

The internet is our shared space. It helps us connect. It spreads opportunity. It enables us to learn. It gives us a voice. It makes us stronger and safer together.

To keep the internet strong, we need to keep it secure. That’s why at Facebook we spend a lot of our energy making our services and the whole internet safer and more secure. We encrypt communications, we use secure protocols for traffic, we encourage people to use multiple factors for authentication and we go out of our way to help fix issues we find in other people’s services.

The internet works because most people and companies do the same. We work together to create this secure environment and make our shared space even better for the world.

This is why I’ve been so confused and frustrated by the repeated reports of the behavior of the US government. When our engineers work tirelessly to improve security, we imagine we’re protecting you against criminals, not our own government.

The US government should be the champion for the internet, not a threat. They need to be much more transparent about what they’re doing, or otherwise people will believe the worst.

I’ve called President Obama to express my frustration over the damage the government is creating for all of our future. Unfortunately, it seems like it will take a very long time for true full reform.

So it’s up to us — all of us — to build the internet we want. Together, we can build a space that is greater and a more important part of the world than anything we have today, but is also safe and secure. I’m committed to seeing this happen, and you can count on Facebook to do our part.

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