Thousands to be employed with Hawaii’s largest public works project

Thousands will be employed with the largest public works project ever in the state of Hawaii.

The Honolulu Authority for Rapid Transportation is hosting its second Industry Day Monday for small business owners, Hawaii contractors, construction-related organizations, Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) firms, small businesses and trade unions.

HART’s goal is to maximize the participation of local companies and organizations in the construction of the rail transit project.

The event is being held with the support of its partners, Move Oahu Forward and the Chamber of Commerce of Hawaii, as well as its participating exhibitors and prime contractors.

Jai Cunningham reports from Salt Lake to learn about job opportunities for Oahu’s rail project.

Click here for more information.

Meanwhile, HART announced they received $61.7 million in General Excise and Use Tax (GET) surcharge revenue this past quarter for construction of the Honolulu rail project.

The State Department of Taxation notified HART of the recent GET quarterly revenue installment, which covers the period of January through March of this year.

“We now have a total of $1.25 billion in surcharge revenue collected for rail,” HART Executive Director and CEO Dan Grabauskas said. “Strong GET surcharge revenue,
along with the $1.55 billion in secured federal funding is keeping us on the right
track to deliver the project on budget.”

“Construction of the rail system is moving forward and this shows the project’s financing is sound,” Mayor Kirk Caldwell said, “Each GET installment moves us that much closer to delivering the rail system and providing much-needed traffic relief.”

The half-percent GET surcharge for Oahu, which by law can only be used for Honolulu’s rail system, began in January 2007 and is set to expire at the end of 2022.

The surcharge is estimated to fund nearly 70 percent of the project’s cost, with the
remaining balance to be paid for with federal funds.

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