USGS: Volcano warning issued for Alaska’s Pavlof Volcano

Lava fountain at summit of Pavlof Volcano, as viewed from Cold Bay Alaska (37 miles southwest of the volcano) early morning, June 3, 2014. Photograph courtesy of Robert Stacy.
Lava fountain at summit of Pavlof Volcano, as viewed from Cold Bay Alaska (37 miles southwest of the volcano) early morning, June 3, 2014. Photograph courtesy of Robert Stacy.

Pavlof Volcano, one of the most active volcanoes in Alaska, is erupting and has prompted a volcano warning from the USGS.

The low-level eruption began on Friday, May 30 and has escalated.

The volcano is producing a continuous steam and ash plume 24,000 feet above sea level.

The Aviation Color Code has been raised to RED and Volcano Alert Level has been raised to WARNING.

  • Aviation Color Code RED
    Eruption is imminent with significant emission of volcanic ash into the atmosphere likely OR eruption is underway or suspected with significant emission of volcanic ash into the atmosphere [ash-plume height specified, if possible].
  • Volcano Alert Level WARNING
    Hazardous eruption is imminent, underway, or suspected.

Pavlof Volcano is one of the most active volcanoes in the Aleutian arc, having erupted more than 40 times since the early 1800’s.

Elevated surface temperatures at the volcano summit have been observed in satellite images since May 30, indicating lava at the surface.

More information from the USGS

MODIS satellite image, showing Pavlof eruption plume stretching to the east. The portion of the plume visible in this image is about 50 miles long. Image taken at 13:44 AKDT, June 2, 2014.
MODIS satellite image, showing Pavlof eruption plume stretching to the east. The portion of the plume visible in this image is about 50 miles long. Image taken at 13:44 AKDT, June 2, 2014.
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