Lava continues to flow from new vents along Kilauea’s East Rift Zone

On Kilauea, lava continues to flow from most of the new vents on Pu’u O’o, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists reported.

An eruption Friday, June 27, along the cone’s northeast flank created a vigorous new flow, about a mile in length.

The eruption also caused the crater floor to sag and partially collapse, revealing a small pool of lava just below its surface.

Pu'u O'o crater on Kilauea on Friday, June 27, 2014 (Photo: USGS)
Pu’u O’o crater on Kilauea on Friday, June 27, 2014 (Photo: USGS)

Most of the flow field is within Kahaualea Natural Area Reserve (NAR) or the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve (DLNR, OHA). Both are areas closed to the public and can only be viewed from the air, the observatory said.

Under favorable weather conditions at night, distant glow from the active flows can be seen from the County Viewing Area at Kalapana and from the end of the Chain of Craters Road within Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawaii.

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Kilauea on Friday, June 27, 2014 (Photo: USGS)
Kilauea on Friday, June 27, 2014 (Photo: USGS)
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