Burst pipe repairs close to completion near UCLA

At least an inch of water covers the playing floor at Pauley Pavilion, home of UCLA basketball, after a broken 30-inch water main under nearby Sunset Boulevard caused flooding that inundated several areas of the UCLA campus in the Westwood section of Los Angeles Tuesday, July 29, 2014. (AP Photo/Mike Meadows)
At least an inch of water covers the playing floor at Pauley Pavilion, home of UCLA basketball, after a broken 30-inch water main under nearby Sunset Boulevard caused flooding that inundated several areas of the UCLA campus in the Westwood section of Los Angeles Tuesday, July 29, 2014. (AP Photo/Mike Meadows)

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Crews have almost finished repairs on a nearly century-old water main that burst and poured 20 million gallons of water onto the UCLA campus.

The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power says Saturday that workers completed replacing the ruptured pipe on Sunset Boulevard, welded a new juncture and installed a pair of 36-inch, two-ton valves.

The new juncture will be reinforced with concrete and extra steel plating.

Now, crews are surrounding the pipe with gravel as a start to repaving the giant sinkhole caused when the pipe erupted in a geyser on Tuesday.

The amount of water released represented about four percent of the total used by the entire city on an average day and occurred in the midst of an epic state drought.

The flooding on the UCLA campus swamped hundreds of cars in parking garages and ruined the new floor at Pauley Pavilion, which will be replaced.

Athletic Director Dan Guerrero said in a statement that the entire floor at Pauley will be replaced by the end of October, and no regular season basketball games would be affected.

No details were provided on the cost of replacing the floor.

Pauley Pavilion underwent a $136 million upgrade just two years ago.

Elsewhere on campus, a parade of tow trucks removed about 400 vehicles that were submerged in the deluge, UCLA spokesman Tod Tamberg said. The process could take several days because workers were still pumping out water and digging through muck and debris.

 

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