What you need to know ahead of the storm

As Hurricane Iselle and Tropical Storm Julio approach, government officials, agencies and residents are all taking action.

State, federal and local authorities gathered for a conference call Monday to discuss what each island is doing to prepare and respond as the storms approach.

“We believe that the storm will impact all of the islands,” said Doug Mayne, Hawaii Emergency Management Agency. “The track is pretty strong for the first 72 hours. After that, it gets a little bit less certain, but we believe there will be storm impact to all the islands.”

Read more: Election officials prepare for Iselle’s fallout

State officials are also urging everyone to know where the closest evacuation shelter is in case you need to leave your home.

The state suggests you remember the three closest locations to your home. Click here to download a complete statewide list of evacuation shelters.

Meanwhile, people are keeping one eye on the storm and the other on their emergency supplies just in case.

The Costco in Iwilei is always busy, but even more so on Monday as people scoured the shelves looking for items to have on hand in the prospect of stormy weather.

Read more: What to put in your hurricane kit

KHON2 saw cases of water being carted out as well as toilet paper.

One mother was not taking any chances with a 2-year-old daughter to worry about if a storm hits.

“I got baby wipes, Pine Sol, and paper towels, canned food,” said Lisa Piiohia. “I had to buy Cup Noodles, which we don’t eat, but just in case.”

Other customers had different priorities. “Lots and lots of water and toilet paper and Diet Coke,” said customer Melissa Fletcher.

Francis Guerrero is prepared to fire up the barbecue with his newly bought bag of charcoal briquettes.

“The last time we had the little earthquake for a few days, I cooked everything, I mean everything, on the barbecue and it worked out pretty good,” he said.

Emergency supplies are also going out the door at City Mill in Iwilei. Employees say in order to protect your windows at home from flying debris in a wind storm, don’t rely on duct tape.

“It’s always better to have pre-cut sheets of plywood, and they can be nailed or screwed right over your windows,” said Frank Suster, safety and facilities manager for City Mill. “Trash bags are good because if you have valuables, things like picture albums, if you have things that you don’t want to get wet, cover them up tightly in a bag, and if there’s a chance if water comes, they won’t get damaged.”

While it is important to have a three-day supply of fresh water to drink — one gallon of water per person per day — it’s also important to have another supply of water available. You can fill it up in a garbage can for another very important purpose.

That’s because if the storm knocks out the water pressure for your toilet, one flush will be your last unless you can fill the bowl again with water.

Other necessities include a seven-day supply of non-perishable food, a battery-powered or hand crank radio, a flashlight and extra batteries and a First Aid kit.

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