Did you see it? Total lunar eclipse visible in Hawaii early Saturday

Credit: Sherie Cerny
Credit: Sherie Cerny
Credit: Irmina Bernal
Credit: Irmina Bernal
Credit: Gary Schwiter
Credit: Gary Schwiter
Credit: Gary Schwiter
Credit: Gary Schwiter
DD Kau
DD Kau
Mile Matsumoto
Mile Matsumoto


For many in the islands, the weather was perfect to view the full lunar eclipse early Saturday morning.

The Hawaiian Islands was the best location to view the eclipse in the U.S. as we were be able to see the event from start to finish.

The April 3-4 eclipse technically started at 11:01 p.m. on April 3 HST. However, for the first 75 minutes or so, there was no visible change in the full moon’s appearance.

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At 12:15 a.m. HST, the partial phase began. You were able to see the moon crossing into the deep inner shadow of the earth, or the umbra. For the next hour or so, we saw a deeper and deeper ‘bite’ taken out of the moon.

TLE2014Apr15-trio2wAt 1:58 a.m., the total phase of the eclipse began. This is when the entire moon is in the earth’s dark inner shadow. The moon was very dark at this point appearing a deep red. The total phase lasted only 4 minutes and 43 seconds for this eclipse.

The total phase of this lunar eclipse ended at 2:02 a.m., as the moon started to move out of the earth’s dark shadow.

The duration of this full eclipse is unusual, as total lunar eclipses usually last for well over a hour. This one was the shortest of the 21st century, and the shortest one since the year 1529.

This second partial phase was from 2:02 a.m. to 3:44 a.m. HST, and more and more of the moon returned to ‘normal.’

As at the start of the eclipse, from 3:44 a.m. to 4:59 a.m. the penumbral phase started where we didn’t see any visible change in the moon.

A lunar eclipse is when the moon falls in the Earth’s shadow, and a total lunar eclipse, also called “blood moon” for its red glow, is rare.

This total lunar eclipse is the third in a series called lunar tetrad, a total of four lunar eclipses occurring in succession every six months. The fourth and last eclipse on Sept. 27, unfortunately, will not be visible from Hawaii.

For more information about the eclipse, click here.

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