Overnight camping charges at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park begin Nov. 1

‘Apua Point (Photo courtesy Jacob W. Frank/National Park Service)
‘Apua Point (Photo courtesy Jacob W. Frank/National Park Service)

Starting Tuesday, Nov. 1, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park will charge for all overnight camping as part of a plan to meet national standards for parks with similar visitor amenities.

For backcountry camping, a $10 fee will be charged per trip, in addition to the park entrance fee. All eight backcountry campsites (Ka‘aha, Halape, Keauhou, ‘Apua Point, Napau, Pepeiao Cabin, Red Hill Cabin and Mauna Loa Cabin) require a permit, with a stay limit of three consecutive nights at one site.

Campers can move to another backcountry site for the fourth night, but no more than seven consecutive nights per trip will be allowed.

Permits must be obtained no more than 24 hours in advance from the Backcountry Office, open daily from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Fees for backcountry camping can be paid in person at the office, or online through pay.gov. Call (808) 985-6178 for more information.

Photo courtesy Jay Robinson/National Park Service
Photo courtesy Jay Robinson/National Park Service

Kulanaokuaiki Campground, a drive-in, front-country campsite off Hilina Pali Road, will cost $10 a night per site, with a stay limit of seven consecutive nights, and a maximum of six people per site. The nine designated campsites at Kulanaokuaiki have picnic tables and tent pads, and are available on a first-come basis. Fees for Kulanaokuaiki can be paid at the campground’s self-registration station. Checkout time is 11 a.m.

The new camping permit fees are similar to other public camping fees statewide. At Kulanaokuaiki, campers who hold the Interagency Senior (Golden Age) and Golden Access passes pay $5 per site.

Namakanipaio Campground off Highway 11 is managed by Hawaii Volcanoes Lodge Company, LLC and is under its own fee structure.

Pets are not permitted in any of the campgrounds, except for leashed pets in Namakanipaio Campground. Leashed service animals are allowed.

Halape (Photo courtesy Jacob W. Frank/National Park Service)
Halape (Photo courtesy Jacob W. Frank/National Park Service)

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